tacanderson:

NASA developing automated air traffic control system for drones.

“One at a time you can make them work and keep them safe,” Parimal H. Kopardekar, a NASA principal investigator, tells the Times. “But when you have a number of them in operation in the same airspace, there is no infrastructure to support it.”

This is something than can be both powerfully enabling as well as powerfully abused. Either through hacking or as a means to exclude people or organizations from participating. It will depend on how this is used. 
h/t GeekWire
tacanderson:

NASA developing automated air traffic control system for drones.

“One at a time you can make them work and keep them safe,” Parimal H. Kopardekar, a NASA principal investigator, tells the Times. “But when you have a number of them in operation in the same airspace, there is no infrastructure to support it.”

This is something than can be both powerfully enabling as well as powerfully abused. Either through hacking or as a means to exclude people or organizations from participating. It will depend on how this is used. 
h/t GeekWire

tacanderson:

NASA developing automated air traffic control system for drones.

“One at a time you can make them work and keep them safe,” Parimal H. Kopardekar, a NASA principal investigator, tells the Times. “But when you have a number of them in operation in the same airspace, there is no infrastructure to support it.”

This is something than can be both powerfully enabling as well as powerfully abused. Either through hacking or as a means to exclude people or organizations from participating. It will depend on how this is used. 

h/t GeekWire

(via emergentfutures)

"Seventeen mysterious cellphone towers have been found in America which look like ordinary towers, and can only be identified by a heavily customized handset built for Android security – but have a much more malicious purpose, according to Popular Science. The fake ‘towers’ – computers which wirelessly attack cellphones via the “baseband” chips built to allow them to communicate with their networks, can eavesdrop and even install spyware, ESD claims. They are a known technology - but the surprise is that they are in active use. The towers were found by users of the CryptoPhone 500, one of several ultra-secure handsets that have come to market in the last couple of years, after an executive noticed his handset was “leaking” data regularly."
"the Coalition government has stripped 16 people, including five born in Britain, of their UK passports. Two, including Sakr, were later killed by drone strikes and one was secretly rendered to the United State"

The scientific A-Team saving the world from killer viruses, rogue AI and the paperclip apocalypse | Technology | The Guardian

New Study Offers Clues to Swift Arctic Extinction - NYTimes.com

"An ancient culture managed to survive in one of the most extreme environments on Earth, an uninterrupted bloodline that spanned thousands of years, only to disappear without a trace."

Uploaded on 28 Aug 2014 http://voc.tv/1orlEGg SUkraine’s military geeks are bringing the fury to the front line. The pro-Ukrainian volunteer fighters were frustrated with the lack of organization and funding of the Ukrainian army, so the self-proclaimed “nerd units” decided to take matters into their own hands. They crowdsourced funds to purchase drones and quadcopters. And now the eye-in-the-sky machines are proving to be a game-changer in the fight against pro-Russian separatists.

Aerial information about enemy fighters is key in any conflict, but for a largely underfunded and inefficient army, like Ukraine’s, it’s hard to come by. The lack of such information hurts in terms of both intel and financing: Every badly aimed mortar is just more money wasted.

With their newfound aerial support, the pro-Ukrainian forces are now using a drone named “The Fury” to call in coordinates for their mortar attacks against the pro-Russian rebels. The Fury has located enemy tanks near Gorlivka, Ukraine, which the soldiers later destroyed, according to a drone pilot whose identity was withheld.

Volunteers like Aleksey Arestovich, a former Ukrainian military intelligence officer, provide the Ukrainian army with great deal of support. Arestovich says the government is too inefficient to effectively fight the war. His battalion, along with others, began to crowdsource the money needed for the drones back in May, and he notes that they received a good chunk of donations from an unexpected source: “kind housewives.”

It’s all part of a grassroots movement to provide ammunition and other tools to help the pro-Ukrainian forces soar, as battalion commander Yuri Bereza says, “like a phoenix rising from its ashes.”

thewallstreetexecutive:


Here’s How The World’s Richest Terrorist Group Makes Millions Every Day thewallstreetexecutive:


Here’s How The World’s Richest Terrorist Group Makes Millions Every Day
errrord:

Original image courtesy of dequalizedFirst posted on 2013-08-25 19:05:05 GMT errrord:

Original image courtesy of dequalizedFirst posted on 2013-08-25 19:05:05 GMT

errrord:

Original image courtesy of dequalized
First posted on 2013-08-25 19:05:05 GMT

brucesterling:

sagansense:

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos. NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

Watching a robotic extension of ourselves observing a moon transiting the nearest star…

*That’s one lumpy moon  brucesterling:

sagansense:

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos. NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

Watching a robotic extension of ourselves observing a moon transiting the nearest star…

*That’s one lumpy moon 

brucesterling:

sagansense:

theoneaboutscience:

Curiosity watched on sol 713 as lumpy Phobos passed across the face of the Sun. There are 84 images in this animation, which runs faster than natural speed. A couple of sunspots are faintly visible. The animation is composed of raw JPEG images, so contains artifacts, particularly at the high-contrast areas at the edges of the Sun and Phobos.
NASA / JPL / MSSS / TAMU / Emily Lakdawalla (via Curiosity sees a Phobos transit, sol 713 | The Planetary Society)

Watching a robotic extension of ourselves observing a moon transiting the nearest star…

*That’s one lumpy moon 

bashford:

Satellite Lamps by Einar Sneve Martinussen, Jørn Knutsen, and Timo Arnall is a project that reveals one of the most significant contemporary technology infrastructures, the Global Positioning System (GPS). Satellite Lamps glow brighter when GPS signals are stronger, and when they use timelapse photography we can see how GPS signals inhabit different everyday spaces.

"Google+, Tumblr and Facebook Groups felt like a tacit admission that the web had taken a wrong turn somewhere around Friendster and was finding its way back to LiveJournal. But now with the rise of newsletters and Snapchat and “right to forget” legislation, it feels like we’re going back even further, perhaps admitting that this whole web thing, with its search engines and caches and screenshots, were perhaps a bad idea to begin with and it’s not to rip it up and start again from e-mail on up."

algopop:

Secret Messaging service found in Google Translate

Security researchers have discovered that strange variations of latin words from the Cicero ‘Lorem Ipsum’ text translate into totally unexpected sentences using Google Translate. Google have now hard-coded the algorithm NOT to translate the words Lorem and Ipsum, but from my tests you can still create secret messages using other Latin words. Suspiciously a lot of the variations produce sentences with the words - China, Russia, Network, NATO, and so on. Since Google translation algorithms learn autonomously through Machine Learning the researchers believe that someone has gamed the system to make it learn this instead. I guess they may have done this by surreptitiously feeding Google with latin/secret language texts.